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June 20, 2007

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Joan A. Conway,

There are some features on MAC that I miss on Microsoft Word and appear to be forever lost to users.

I also am not a fan of limiting product by time it was available for publication on the internet to 18 months.

I often seek Minutes on Hearings, such as the American Bar Association Washington, D.C. Meetings, from the past to find out they are no longer available to me. These are material evidence of the 'frame of mind' of our federal administrator(s), such as Gilbert Casellas, Chief of EEOC 1996. I desire to have his (on or about) April 25, 1996 speech before the ABA on revamping the EEOC after several years of having no Chief. Does anyone out there know how I can get this.

Joan A. Conway,

"This is not your father’s Microsoft."

During the middle eighties, when I was first introduced to computers I started with Fortran at San Diego Community College, awaiting to attend San Diego State University.

San Diego Community College was way behind the times.

However, some schools often provide their students with your father's computer knowledge in an attempt to fill the void of not being able to do otherwise.

Yes, it was a big waste of my time and very profitable for a has-been Fortran instructor.

But then having to repeat Statistics 6 times was a much bigger waste of my time, when in fact, I never used it in my brief career as a sales and use tax auditor for the State Board of Equalization, in California.

This is a simple case of 'Male Chauvinism' of some males, or even females, employed as Instructors, who are Statisticians.

After the many attempts at Statistics, a requirement for a C.P.A., I moved to another state, Illinois (my home), and De Paul University, where took the course to get a passing grade and make up the deficiency to get a diploma denied by SDSU for grade point deficiency. I could not get a grade above 'D' there.

At DePaul, I found, to my delight, Dr. Goes, a German female professor, who gave me an 'A' grade without all of horrible mind-games and hostile environment that I endured at San Diego State University, from the university's best professor and another genius from M.I.T. on his way to Stanford University at as he hoped Zerox. Both were far too competitive to learn under, because they felt threatened for some odd reason, was it because I was a female and over 40 years of age, or because I was always good in math, statistics was no exception given a chance to do so.

It appears to me many who teach in the math field have an inferior complex with those in the business schools, thus accounting for the treacherous conduct they impose on some of their student(s).

For them I only wish they get their come-up-pence, and I inform all potential math students beware of their deadly instructions, as they wish to destroy you if you are viewed as a competitor!

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